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September 2019: Talent and skills, Casualisation of work, and ageing workforces

This month, we touch on how to talk to employees about the future of work as the Vice Chairman of Prudential Financial shares insights on the conversations that should be happening now in the workplace. Also, Will Stonge, co-director of the Autonomy think tank discusses whether we should be working to live or living to work in an ageing workforce, and the RSA’s comprehensive report suggests developing a social contract to combat the rising economic insecurity.

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August 2019: Technology and work, Reskilling, and Leadership in the future of work

Our newsletter this month includes an article by Jacques Bughin and James Manyika of McKinsey who look at how to use technology to smooth disruption and improve wellbeing, a Fabian Society article considering how AI and robots will impact work in different ways and how each will need different strategic policy responses, details of a new Government scheme to retrain workers whose jobs are lost to automation, and a question: will automation improve work for women - or make it worse?

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JULY 2019: FUTURE SKILLS, GENDER IMPACT OF A.I., AND REGULATION V INNOVATION

This month we bring you part 2 of a series by Rachel Brushfield of Energise highlighting the skills needed to succeed in tomorrow’s world of work, and our poll in which we ask you about your thoughts on pay transparency. There is (amongst other great links we’ve found) a fascinating report by McKinsey which finds that gender inequality may worsen as AI displaces more workers.

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JUNE 2019: HUMANNESS, AUTOMATION, GEN Z, AND UNIVERSAL BASIC INCOMES

In this month’s email update, what Generation Z really want from their employee experience, Johann Berlin of TLEX Institute lists three key elements for leaders to consider in the future of humans at work, Julian Birkinshaw considers the kinds of jobs humans will be left with once AI and automation reaches its potential, and the BBC is reporting that Professor Guy Standing at SOAS University suggests that every adult in the UK should receive a weekly basic income.

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MAY 2018: AGEING WORKFORCE, FUTURE SKILLS AND L&D, DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION, AND THE FUTURE JOBS OF 2050

Our newsletter this month includes an article by Ravin Jesuthasan of Willis Towers Watson arguing that the way we think about L&D needs to adapt to keep up with advances in technology, and a new report from Raconteur explores the sea-change required in both managerial mind-set and company culture to prepare for the future of work. We’ve also found a great article highlighting the jobs of the future: Chief Productivity Officer and AI psychologist.

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APRIL 2019: FUTURE SKILLS, MILLENNIAL MYTHS, AUTOMATION RISK

In the first of an exclusive two part series, Rachel Brushfield of Energise Legal examines what skills, qualities and attitudes are needed to succeed in the future world of work. We’ve also found you a great podcast from People Management that looks at how organisations could benefit from moving away from reductive stereotypes of millennials and younger generations. In other news, around 1.5 million jobs in England are at high risk of being automated in the future, shows new ONS analysis.

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MARCH 2019: INTELLIGENT AUTOMATION, GENDER BIAS AND GOOD WORK

Welcome to the March 2019 newsletter! In the spotlight this month, automation specialist Alex Croucher of Intelligent Automation gives us his exclusive view on how automation will affect the future of work, and a shorter working week could help both business and workers address heavy workloads, stress and anxiety, comments Will Stronge for the Guardian. There is also news that Finnish trials of basic income suggest the policy has real-world potential, according to Anthony Painter of the RSA.

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FEBRUARY 2019: HUMANICS, ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, AND ROBOTS AND THE C-SUITE

There are so many big questions in this month’s newsletter. Will 2019 be the year HR fully embraces artificial intelligence? IS humanics a way to 'robot-proof' your career? How will robots transform the C-Suite? What does the world really think about globalisation? And we have our own questions too. In this month’s poll, we ask you about skills mismatches - are you tackling this?

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JANUARY 2019: A NEW YEAR, A NEW POLL, AND TWO EVENTS…

Another year is over, a new one has just begun. We start the year by looking back at our most popular content from 2018, covering a broad range of subjects such as the freelance future, ethnics and automation, career returners as untapped talent, and the 10 skills we’ll all need for 2020. We also start a new monthly poll: this week we want to know your feelings on the job creation vs destruction argument that rages with AI and automation. All that AND there are two amazing events coming soon…

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DECEMBER 2018: ETHICS AND AUTOMATION, MICROCHIPPING EMPLOYEES AND VIRTUAL TRAINING

In this month’s newsletter, we’ve got exclusive original content by the CIPD’s Edward Houghton who looks at how automation will impact HR and the role of ethics in a future filled with AI, data and algorithms. From around the web, we have (amongst other articles) news that the Trades Union Congress has raised concerns over technology being used to control and micromanage workers, and a Quartz report that it will be skills, not job titles, that will help workers differentiate themselves in the future world of work.

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NOVEMBER 2018: training older workers and tackling skills mismatches

As well as a rundown of our recent event, this month’s email update includes a warning from the CIPD acting chief economist that older workers looking to develop their skills are being hindered by the shortage of learning opportunities, an exclusive piece by Adrian Wakeling, Senior Policy Advisor at Acas, in which he shares some key learnings from a recent Acas conference on the future of work, and a report from the CIPD that looks at how well workers’ skills are being used with guidance on countering skills mismatches.

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OCTOBER 2018: the evolving office and disrupting HR, our event on A.I. and Algorithms, and the benefits of automation

As well as news of our big event this year, this month’s newsletter contains several fascinating reads about artificial intelligence. Jeanne Meister takes a look at three new HR job roles illustrating how much HR is being disrupted by A.I., Dr Chris Bauer claims in City AM that adopting artificial intelligence into the workplace has many potential benefits, McKinsey says that A.I. could boost GDP growth by a massive 1.2%, and a study from Henley Business School has revealed that automated programmes could free up to 12 working days per year in admin time.

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SEPTEMBER 2018: remote working, future skills, and AI and algorithms

Our picks this month include a piece from Merv Dinnen with thoughts from jobseekers about the changing world of work, a blog from NESTA that takes a look at what government, educators and employers should be doing to give the workforce the right skills for 2030, a report from Ius Laboris that offers an international perspective on employment in the gig economy, and a report from the Independent that, thanks to Artificial Intelligence, the need for humans to work for survival could soon be at an end.

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AUGUST 2018: preparing for the 4th industrial revolution, skills for HR leaders, and barriers for older workers

We’ve sourced some great reads from around the web this month. Firms and government must address the impact of technology through retraining, says Siemens boss Joe Kaeser. It’s time for HR to kick old habits and drive businesses forward, comments Lars Schmidt for Fast Company. The number of over-50s out of work is an ‘unacceptable’ waste of talent, says the Women and Equalities Committee.

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july 2018: 100 years of life and the ageing workforce, A.I., skills for 2030, and automation ≠ job killer

We’ve got 5 ways that AI will make your life easier, tips for guiding employees through 100 years of working life, the 3 key skills for workers in 2030, how to prepare your jobs for jobs that don’t even exist, research from the Government Equalities Office about untapped pools of talent to help fill the skills gap, and a report from Deutsche bank arguing that automation is not a job killer.

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June 2018: 4 day working week, war for talent, and employee monitoring

In this month’s newsletter, we’ve got an RSA article claiming that a better work-life balance can’t come from simply switching to a 4 day week, a report that developments in AI will put HR jobs at risk, Shanghai’s robot bank, a call from BEIS to automate HR tasks to boost productivity, and why we need to protect our income from the rise of robot automation.

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may 2018: Karl Burnett, automation, robot managers, and the rise of marxism

There is some great content this month. A Guardian article looks at a Canadian business that has automated its HR department and asks whether employing robot managers is going a step too far. A study from Culture Amp says older people just want the same things as millennials. An Independent article by Hamish McRae discusses the repetitive jobs that are already being lose to robots and automation. We have an exclusive interview with Karl Burnett of A+E networks

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APRIL 2018: changing attitudes to work, women and A.I., and an ageing workforce 'crisis'

Algorithms are displaying white male bias. How can this be addressed? This month’s newsletter has an article by Ivana Bartoletti of the Fabian Women’s Network looking at this issue. In other news, Jasmine Gartner – trainer, anthropologist and business consultant – writes exclusively for us about the way we think about “work”, and Mercer reports that the ageing population and falling net migration will lead to a severe shortage in the UK labour market by 2025.

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march 2018: universal basic income, the workplace skills of the future, and the impact of remote working

This month’s edition includes the Government’s response to the Taylor Review on modern workplace practices, Jake Thorold of the RSA setting out the case for Universal Basic Income in the New Statesman, an original piece on our site about the importance of career returners in the search for talent, a New Zealand experiment involving 4 day working, another analysis of whether robots will actually steal our jobs, and the weirdest job titles of 2018.

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FEBRUARY 2018: reskilling workers, the productivity problem, and the 10 HR trends that will matter most in an automated world of work

Our email update this month includes exclusive comment by Rachel Brushfield of Energise - she explores how an individual’s personal values could be the key to solve the UK’s productivity crisis. Other news this month includes a report by McKinsey which says that senior executives are seeing an urgent need to help workers develop the right skills for a changing world of work and a Forbe article by Jeanne Meister looking at 10 trends that will matter most as AI begins its takeover of the workplace.

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January 2018: our most read articles of 2017, enforced leisure, and the impact of emerging technologies on work

So that was the year that was. But what were our most enjoyed articles? We’ve collated them all together in this week’s newsletter. We also bring you a great Raconteur article by Oliver Blach in which he considers whether, as robots and algorithms take more jobs, enforced leisure will be matched by sustained living standards. Other news we bring you includes Birgitte Andersen of the Big Innovation Centre suggesting that data is set to play the role of coal, oil and electricity in this current fourth industrial revolution.

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December 2017: more future-proofing, the fourth industrial revolution, and the algorithmic workplace

This month you can read the next parts of our report into how businesses can future-proof their workplaces. Our email update also brings you comment from Benedict Dellot of the RSA arguing that algorithms could (contrary to popular thought) actually bring a more humane and less biased workplace, as well as news that an industry-led review which as concluded that advanced digital technology could give UK manufacturing a huge boost and create hundreds of thousands of new jobs.

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November 2017: future-proofing businesses, the future office, and the digital talent gap

This month we bring you the very first in our seven part serialisation of our big new report looking at how businesses can future-proof their workplaces (click the link at the top of the page to subscribe and ensure you don’t miss out on the next ones). Also featuring this month is a look at what the office of the future might look like, as well as a report from Capgemini and LinkedIn which considers whether companies are doing enough to close the digital talent gap.

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october 2017: digital transformation, robot tax, and the future of skills

The newsletter this month includes two great blogs from near futurist Ade McCormack which look at the challenges for businesses caused by digital transformation, technology and the future of work. We also bring you news from the Guardian arguing that proposals to tax robots are the right way to deal with automation and the robot revolution, as well as a Nesta/Pearson/University of Oxford report looking at the skills gap and what skills needed in the workforce in 2030.

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SEPTEMBER 2017: interview with nigel Miller of Edelman, four hour working day, a post-work future, and productivity

September’s edition of the Future of Work Hub newsletter is a bumper one. In the spotlight this month, we’ve got Nigel Miller of Edelman who talks to us about his world of work and the predictions for the future, a suggestions that the four-hour working day should be the target for everyone, Matt Cole argues for a society without work, and the “productivity paradox” - the BBC investigates the link between technology and productivity.

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August 2017: future of leadership x2, millennial myths, skills gap

In the spotlight this month: the latest two(!) pieces from Finn Jackson on the future of leadership, original Lewis Silkin comment on employment practices in the modern economy, the £2bn cost of the skills gap (according to the Open University), and debunking the widely held beliefs about millennials at work.

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JULY 2017: Pensions for the future, the talent challenge, and the key to productive home working

Want to read the second in Finn Jackson’s series on the future of leadership? Want to know about the future of pensions and the impact of auto enrolment and the gig economy? Or maybe get some tips for keeping an ageing workforce happy? Or preparing for an automated tomorrow? Or read an assessment of homeworking and productivity? You should read this month’s bumper edition. It’s got all this and more!

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JUNE 2017: Cathy Temple of Oracle, the decline of full-time employment, and why we need to talk about good work

We’ve got a great interview with Cathy Temple, Senior HR Director at Oracle, in which she gives her view on the future of work. Our newsletter this month also includes (amongst others) the first in a series of exclusive pieces by Finn Jackson, Paul Mason writing in the Guardian about bank holidays, Matthew Taylor (currently reviewing modern employment practices) arguing for “good work”, and a People Management article saying that HR need to understand how to engage and motivate an increasingly contingent workforce.

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May 2017: Universal basic income, data science and the lawyer, the impact of robotics on the workplace, and lifelong learning

Our update this month includes two original pieces from Lewis Silkin: one putting forward the case for employment lawyers to embrace data science and analytics, and another commenting on the impact of A.I., robotics and technology on work. Also featuring are a report by the Skills Commission with recommendations to government, employers and training providers to improve lifelong learning, and news elsewhere that: UBI + gig economy = the future of work?

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APRIL 2017: mental health, older workers, and rich robots

A Guardian article says that AI and robotics will continue to improve, but without political change the outcome will range from bad to apocalyptic as robots take both our jobs and our money, making the rich even richer. In cheerier news, the BBC reports that the proportion of women working into their 70s in the UK has doubled in the last four years. Exclusive comment this week is provided by Adrian Wakeling of ACAS who sets out his 7 steps to a better future for mental health and wellbeing at work.

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MARCH 2017: fulfillment and the future of work, robot tax and retirement age

Our newsletter this month includes a piece by Phil Sheridan of Robert Half that asks how can businesses can prepare for workforce automation and support the need for lifelong learning. There is also an original and exclusive piece by Rachel Brushfield of Energise in which she explores “fulfillment” at work and how the changing expectations of workers are making companies rethink ways of working. Elsewhere, Bill Gates argues for a tax on robots to compensate those who lose jobs to automation.

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February 2017: brexit and retirement, Universal basic income, gender pay gap

There is lots of news this month. Stories include: data modelling for the Guardian shows that cuts to migration as a result ofa hard Brexit will drastically skew the ratio of working-age people to pensioners, Guy Standing assessing whether the idea that an unconditional income scheme would work in the UK ,and figures from the UK Statistics Authority show just 12% of high earners are women. Also, the BEIS Parliamentary inquiry on the future world of work has published the evidence submitted.

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January 2017: 2016 in review, looking forward to 2017, and Tech, A.i., automation and women

Happy new year! This month’s newsletter includes a People Management article by Dan Dackombe of Linkedin who argues that talent mapping, employer brand and social media will be vital to HR success in 2017, and a Guardian article by Jane Gilmore who claims that, for most disadvantaged women, technology and AI will diminish work opportunities and increase barriers to upskilling.

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December 2016: A.i. and inequality, high intensity workplaces, and gig economy

This month’s newsletter includes a fascinating BBC report that the Government will lose £3.5bn in revenue if it doesn’t work out how to tax gig economy workers by 2020, and Jenny McAllister in the Guardian says that automation will embed gender inequality at work – unless we fix it now.

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November 2016: Rob Mosley of Paramount, young workers and work-life balance, and latest on the gig economy

Research by Willis Towers Watson has found that young employees are much more likely to be hit by workplace stress, the Mckinsey Global Institute examines different models of work and the particular challenges presented by independent work, and news that the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee will investigate the rapidly changing nature of work and the employment status and rights of workers.

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October 2016: a review of employment practices, automation, and an interview with Deborah Kester of Man Group

This month’s newsletter brings the second of a series of interviews with HR leaders across a variety of sectors with Deborah Kester talking to us about current and future changes in her world of work. Matt Taylor of the RSA has been announced the independent reviewer of employment practice, Richard Kauntze argues in City AM that the physical office will never die, and a report form UBS into the changing workforce looks at how employers will move, motivate and retain workers during the 2020s.

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September 2016: the impact of lower migration, robots in Asia, and reframing the maternity debate

Geraldine Gallacher, MD of the Executive Coaching Consultancy, discusses female talent and the challenges faced by employers in retaining women after maternity leave and offers some suggestions as to how managers can best support women that want to return to work. Quartz reports that 56% of salaried workers in Asia could be replaced by robots, and Chris Baker of Concur finds that the “presenteeism” problem has become a mainstay of the British employee.

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August 2016: older workers, age discrimination, and millennials

The Future of Work Hub newsletter this month deals with the ageing workforce. In the spotlight this month Adrian Wakeling, Senior Policy Advisor at Acas, gives some clues as to what older workers can tell us about what the workplace issues of the future might be, and Andrew Smith of Matrix Chambers looks at some of the practical challenges facing employers in light of changing workplace demographics and the 10 year anniversary of age discrimination law in the UK. Quartz investigates how society might adapt to extended working lives and millennials never retiring.

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July 2016: the workplace in 2066, retaining female talent, robots and the workplace, and wearables at work

This month, we bring news from Management Today who offer three scenarios of what working lives could look like in 50 years’ time, a behavioural explanation on why robots won’t replace humans any time soon, and suggestions how to attract and retain female talent for the future. We also bring news that PwC research shows unwillingness of workers to use wearable devices in the workplace.

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June 2016: migration and skills, home-working and France's plan to ban emails out of hours

Our email roundup this month includes an article from Neil Jennings of Lewis Silkin LLP who explores the debate surrounding the effect of migration on employment and skills in the UK, and Richard Goff, partner at Archipelago connections, looks at how a national workforce strategy could help businesses. Claudia Filsinger of the Executive Coaching Consultancy begins the first of a series of articles that explore how managers can successfully coach remotely and across cultures.

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May 2016: managing change in a culturally different country, the six-hour work day and the quest for digital skills 

Emma Richardson, Director of Worksphere at Lewis Silkin LLP, reflects on the challenges and opportunities of managing change in a different country. Elsewhere, David D’Souza (Head of London for the CIPD) raises some interesting questions about the future of work in a fascinating blog and we bring news from Lauren Davidson writing for The Telegraph that 6 out of 10 bosses think cutting employees’ hours (to just 6 a day) could be good for business.

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April 2016: women on boards, gender equality, workplace design, the office of the future, and all things talent management

In the newsletter this month, a McKinsey report discusses the challenge of achieving more gender equal leadership in an organisation, Owen Jones gives his opinion on why we should be aspiring to a more balanced life in an article for the Guardian, a report by Australian entrepreneur Michael Priddis that machines won’t have it all their way in the future world of work, and the future workplace will be a collaborative and chairless green paradise according to Fast Company.

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March 2016: automation and our work-obsessed society, the skills gap, and women on boards

What questions do we need to ask about the purpose and value of our jobs? David Frayne of Cardiff University has answered this pressing question in a great new blog. In other news, BBC News explores what millennials want from work, Mercedes trades in assembly line robots for more capable humans according to a Guardian report, and just focusing on ‘women on boards’ ignores wider issues, research from Mercer suggests.

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February 2016: five generations of worker, demographic dilemma in Japan and skills gap talent poverty

This week we bring key insights from Rachel Brushfield on managing five generations of worker in the workplace, whilst Abi Frederick looks at the demographic dilemma faced by Japan’s ageing workforce and a Deloitte survey of millennials explores how to win over this key demographic. On the skills gap, a new report suggests employers facing talent poverty as skills shortages rise 130% in 4 years.

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January 2016: gender pay gap, digital workplaces and flexible working

In this week’s newsletter, we take a look at the policy considerations behind moves to close the UK gender pay gap and the Danish experience, whilst Gemma Reucroft HR Director at Tunstall discusses what it means to be truly flexible. Elsewhere, there’s news of Facebook’s new HQ in India - the largest open plan office in the world - that has just opened, and an Unwork report on the importance of collaboration in the context of changing work and workplaces.

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DECEMBER 2015: A robot revolution, preparing pupils for the future of work, and modern slavery in a globalised world

The global economy will be transformed over next 20 years at risk of growing inequality according to analysts at Merrill Lynch, and Claudia Harris argues that preparing children for jobs that don’t exist yet requires much more engagement from businesses. Three quarters of UK companies predict skills shortages, says research from Robert Half.

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November 2015: The ageing workforce, 4 generation workplaces, and managing millennials

This month’s edition was an ageing workforce special. Loubna Laroussi of Cirrus writes that leaders should balance the needs of different individuals, rather than the needs of different generations whilst the Huffington Post considers the implications of an ageing workforce on jobs and skills. Rohit Talwar thinks that today’s children could work until they’re 100, but what occupations might they take on?

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OCTOBER 2015: Future of work tips for HR, the impact of technology on jobs, and fixing the UK productivity gap

In this month’s edition, Mervyn Dinnen discusses current developments in the world of work impacting business and HR professionals, Conor D’Arcy of the Resolution Foundation offers insights into how we can tackle low pay and boost productivity, and news that employers across Sweden have introduced a six hour work day in a bid to increase the productivity and happiness of workers.

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